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Accident leads to drug charges for Oklahoma woman

On the morning of Oct. 3, a woman was involved in a two-car accident in Washington County after she glanced down to look at her car’s radio. She was taken into custody when officers allegedly found a gun and drugs in her SUV. The 25-year-old Tulsa resident faces six felony drug and weapons possession charges including counts of possessing methamphetamine with the intent to deliver and possessing a firearm while a convicted felon.

Firefighter finds gun

The accident took place at the intersection of Apple Hill Road and U.S. Highway 62 near Prairie Grove at approximately 10 a.m. Emergency responders say that they arrived to find two SUVs in a ditch. Reports indicate that a Toyota SUV was struck at a high rate of speed by a black SUV as it waited to make a left turn. The Toyota’s driver told police that he noticed the oncoming black SUV but failed to get out of its way. One of the firefighters contacted law enforcement after allegedly noticing a gun in the black SUV while extracting its female driver.

Drugs and drug paraphernalia

A search of the SUV is said to have led officers to 148 grams of methamphetamine and items commonly used to weigh, package and distribute the drug, including digital scales and plastic bags. The woman, who reportedly told police officers that she was not looking at the road ahead when she struck the Toyota, was placed in custody and transported to a nearby hospital to be evaluated.

Remaining silent

According to media reports, the woman is invoking her right to remain silent and refusing to answer any questions until she has spoken with a lawyer. Experienced criminal defense attorneys may advise others facing serious drug charges to do the same. Prosecutors are often willing to make significant concessions to secure cooperation and resolve nonviolent narcotics cases quickly, but their plea offers might be far less generous if suspects have already confessed to the police.