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Ignition interlocks are widely used in Oklahoma

A person who is convicted of a drunk driving offense might be told that they need to have an ignition interlock installed on their vehicle. This is a device that requires the driver to blow a breath sample into it. This is checked for the presence of alcohol. If the person who blows into the device has a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) that is higher than the set limit, the device won’t start.

There are a few points that a person might be told when they learn that they must install an ignition interlock device. The time that they have to have the device varies according to which one applies to their case.

  • First revocation if the driver refused the test or had a BAC of .15 percent or more. This requires a 1.5-year period with the device.
  • The second revocation comes with a mandatory four-year period with the device installed. This can be longer if the person’s driving privileges aren’t reinstated by then.
  • Third or subsequent revocation requires a mandatory five-year period for the ignition interlock. This can also be extended if the driving privileges aren’t reinstated before that time ends.

Another interesting thing to remember is that if you have the ignition interlock requirement on your driver’s license, you can only drive vehicles with one. This means that even your employer would need to have the device installed on any company vehicle that you drive. It is sometimes possible for the employer to request that the device isn’t installed on the company vehicle, but there is a chance that this request will be denied.

This is only one of the factors that you need to think about when you are facing a drunk driving charge. Understanding what might happen with your case might help you to determine your defense.